Digital Britain Interim Report

This report has been widely publicised. There is very little in the interim report that does not have importance for IT lawyers but we highlight the elements of most obvious importance.

The Digital Britain Interim Report was published on 29 January. It is worth a careful examination by any lawyer involved with the Internet or any aspect of copyright. It can be read here: http://www.culture.gov.uk/what_we_do/broadcasting/5631.aspx

Of obvious interest to lawyers are the action points outlined under the heading Digital Content in relation to ‘the Economics of Digital Content’. The main content there is as follows:

ACTION 11

By the time the final Digital Britain Report is published the Government will have explored with interested parties the potential for a Rights Agency to bring industry together to agree how to provide incentives for legal use of copyright material; work together to prevent unlawful use by consumers which infringes civil copyright law; and enable technical copyright-support solutions that work for both consumers and content creators. The Government also welcomes other suggestions on how these objectives should be achieved.

ACTION 12

Before the final Digital Britain Report is published we will explore with both distributors and rights-holders their willingness to fund, through a modest and proportionate contribution, such a new approach to civil enforcement of copyright (within the legal frameworks applying to electronic commerce, copyright, data protection and privacy) to facilitate and co-ordinate an industry response to this challenge. It will be important to ensure that this approach covers the need for innovative legitimate services to meet consumer demand, and education and information activity to educate consumers in fair and appropriate uses of copyrighted material as well as enforcement and prevention work.

ACTION 13

Our response to the consultation on peer-to-peer file sharing sets out our intention to legislate, requiring ISPs to notify alleged infringers of rights (subject to reasonable levels of proof from rights-holders) that their conduct is unlawful. We also intend to require ISPs to collect anonymised information on serious repeat infringers (derived from their notification activities), to be made available to rights-holders together with personal details on receipt of a court order. We intend to consult on this approach shortly, setting out our proposals in detail.

 

Published: 2009-01-30T16:04:37

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