Podcast: SCL 5th Annual Policy Forum 2010: The Future of "Open"

Podcasts of talks at the SCL 5th Annual Policy Forum

For just over a decade, 'open' has been the 'new black' of IT law. A concept that found its legs with 'open source software' in the late nineties, it now spans subject matter as diverse as 'open access publishing', 'open information', 'open rights' and 'open law'. It has seen the birth of the initiatives as diverse as the Creative Commons, the Human Genome Project and BAILII.

This year's Policy Forum asked; if the Noughties saw the genesis of 'open', did they also see both its heyday and, ultimately, the start of its decline in importance? In short, what is the future of 'open', in all its iterations?

Use the links below to listen to the talks and view the accompanying slides

Day 1

Introduction & Welcome [ Audio (mp3) ] 
Andrew Charlesworth, University of Bristol and Mark Turner, Partner, Herbert Smith LLP

Net neutrality and the future openness of networks
Are the transformative consequences for economy and society, promised by advocates of ICT-mediated collaboration, being delivered? Are those transformative consequences necessarily positive? What does the future hold for open networks, and what should be the role of the law?
 
Keynote Speaker
Professor Nico van Eijk, Media and Telecommunications Law, Institute for Information law, University of Amsterdam [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]
Discussant: Tim Cowen, Open Computing Alliance

Open Source Software
After Jacobsen v Katzer, is all the excitement over? Will SaaS and Cloud Computing spell the end for OSS as we know it, or shift its focus firmly to platform and infrastructure? What does the future hold for GPLv3 and the Affero GPL? Will there be a GPLv4 and what will it look like?  What might be the OSS licence of choice in the future?

Panel
Clive Thorne, Partner, IP, Technology & Outsourcing Group, Reynolds Porter Chamberlain LLP [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]
Professor Ian Walden,  Professor of Information and Communications Law and Head of the Institute of Computer and Communications Law at CCLS, Queen Mary, University of London, Of Counsel to Baker & McKenzie LLP and Public Interest Board Member, Internet Watch Foundation [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ] 

Open Culture
Are Flickr and YouTube the best that we can do? Are we seeing a backlash against a culture of openness, based on intellectual property rights and private censorship (e.g. defamation, privacy law)?

Chair: 
Dr Ian Brown - Oxford Internet Institute

Panel: 
Professor Chris Reed, Professor of Electronic Commerce Law at CCLS, Queen Mary, University of London [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]
Graham Smith, Partner, Bird & Bird LLP [ Audio (mp3) ]
Dr Lucie Guibault, Assistant Professor, Copyright and Intellectual Property Law, Institute for Information Law, University of Amsterdam  [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]

Open Information
Has FOI made a great difference, beyond permitting climate change deniers to hassle scientists, or giving journalists an easy ride to a story?  What does the future of open information look like, is it the Iraq Inquiry? Or Wikileaks? Has the open information revolution run its course or just begun?

Chair: 
Judith Rauhofer, Editor, Practical Law Company

Panel: 
Caroline Wilson, Lecturer, ILAWS, University of Southampton [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]
Jordan Hatcher, Director, Open Knowledge Foundation [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]
Andrew Charlesworth, Reader in IT and Law, Director, Centre for IT and Law, School of Law/Department of Computer Science, University of Bristol [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]

Day 2
The Open Cloud 
New 'Open'ings.  The latest happening technological paradigm is the 'Cloud', and no sooner had its first dedicated conferences ended, than the 'Open Cloud' debate began. Do 'Open Cloud Manifestos' and 'Open Cloud Declarations' symbolise a further generation of 'open', or is 'open' now just another PR puff?

Chair: 
Simon Bradshaw, Research Assistant, Cloud Computing Project, CCLS, Queen Mary, University of London [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]

Panel: 
Bridget Treacy, Partner, Hunton & Williams [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]
Dervish Tayyip, Head of UK Legal, Microsoft Limited [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]
Tim Cowen, Open Computing Alliance [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]

Open Lives 
With scenarios such as that surrounding the Nightjack case, have we reached the high watermark of blogging, and the use of the Internet and open media technologies for dissemination by individuals of valuable/public interest knowledge to a mass audience.

Chair:
Professor Lilian Edwards, Professor of Internet Law, University of Sheffield

Panel: 
Robin Wilton, Research Director, Gartner Research [ Audio (mp3) ]
Trevor Callaghan, Product Counsel, Google [ Audio (mp3) ]
David Allen Green,  Head of Media at Preiskel & Co LLP and writer of "Jack of Kent" blog  (shortlisted for the George Orwell Prize 2010) [ Audio (mp3) ]

The Open Citizen
In principle libel, hate speech, criminal activity and national security are all legitimate constraints on online freedoms, but where the balance lies is currently decided on a case by case and country by country basis.  The problems of Google in China, of RIM in Asia and India and the US government's reaction to Wikileaks are all examples of the fragmented and piecemeal approach to these important issues.  Should we be taking the initiative in building a coherent framework for the resolution of these debates by developing a model of online citizenship to define users' rights and obligations?"

Chair: 
Andrew Charlesworth, Reader in IT and Law, Director, Centre for IT and Law, School of Law/Department of Computer Science, University of Bristol.

Speaker:  
Mark Turner, Partner, Herbert Smith LLP [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]

14.30 – 16.00: Open Lawyering
Information technology was supposed to change the way that lawyers and the public interacted; access to, and provision of, legal services was supposed to become more 'open'.  Fourteen years on from the predictions of 'The Future of Law', what will the practice of law look like in the future?

Chair:
Graham Smith
, Partner, Bird & Bird LLP

Panel: 
Simon Beswick, Managing Partner, Osborne Clarke [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]
Jeremy Newton, Director, Technology Law Alliance [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]
Daniel Pollick, Chief Information Officer, DLA Piper UK LLP [ Audio (mp3) / Slides (pdf) ]

Published: 2010-11-02T09:39:04

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